Sign The Referendum & Vote On The Mall

by The Editors on September 11, 2015

Caruso Bad
Anti mall sticker as seen on the seawall.

We believe that placing a shopping mall on the shores of Carlsbad’s Hedionda Lagoon is such a ridiculously dumb idea that we’ve found it difficult to even comment. Exactly why it’s foolish seems so obvious as to make listing the reasons redundant. We’ll cut to the chase: The Carlsbad City Council believes putting a mall on the lagoon is such a good idea that they approved Los Angeles based developer Rick Caruso’s plans without even asking the citizens of Carlsbad to vote. Luckily a group of Carlsbad citizens (Citizens For North County) believe we should vote on it. That’s why they’re out getting signatures for a referendum that will overturn the Carlsbad City Council’s approval and put the Hedionda Lagoon Mall up for vote to everyone in Carlsbad.

If you think the citizens of Carlsbad should have a voice in deciding the future of the community and a beautiful piece of open space on the shores of the Hedionda Lagoon, then you should sign the referendum.

This afternoon (Friday, September 11, 2015) you can sign the petition at the corner of Highland and Basswood from 2 PM to 6 PM. Or stop by the Dove Library (at Dove and El Camino Real) to sign. All your signature means is that you’d like the people of Carlsbad to have a vote on the Mall.

For a little more background on the issues and the current state of chicanery surrounding this mall project please follow the jump for a nice overview by Richard Riehl. [click to continue…]


Happy Hour Politics And The Border

by The Editors on June 8, 2015

Join Happy Hour Politics on Wednesday, June 17th, 2015 at The Crossing At Carlsbad to meet Michael Page, US Border Patrol Agent. Michael is with the Information and Communication Division, and is the Border Community Liaison Agent in charge of the Northwestern part of the San Diego Sector. He currently works at the I-5 Checkpoint in San Clemente. Be there on June 17th to hear about the Border Patrol and its operations, and the problems and concerns facing these agents on a daily basis. Keep in mind that our San Diego border is the busiest in the nation!

The United States Border Patrol is the mobile, uniformed law enforcement arm of U.S. Customs and Border Protection within the Department of Homeland Security responsible for securing U.S. borders between ports of entry. Since 9/11, the focus of the Border Patrol has changed to detection, apprehension and/or deterrence of terrorists and terrorist weapons. Although the Border Patrol has changed dramatically since its inception in 1924, its overall mission remains unchanged: to detect and prevent the illegal entry of aliens into the United States. Together with other law enforcement officers, the Border Patrol helps maintain borders that work, facilitating the flow of legal immigration and goods while preventing the illegal trafficking of people and contraband.

For all the details, please follow the jump. [click to continue…]


Happy Hour Politics: Juliet Cunningham

by The Editors on April 3, 2015

Juliet CunninghamJoin Happy Hour Politics on Wednesday, April 22nd, to hear Juliet Cunningham speak about her life and struggles as an Assyrian Christian in Iraq. Juliet was the first in her family to escape from Iraq in 1979 and was able to help all of her 13 siblings do the same! It’s a story you don’t want to miss!

Juliet will also speak to the current situation in her home country, and how devastating the terrorists and ISIS conquests have been to Iraq, known as the cradle of Christianity. . . Juliet’s relatives escaped Syria in 1915 when Christians were purged by the Ottoman Empire. The family settled in Iraq. Juliet was born in Kirkuk, Iraq, and graduated from the University of Baghdad with a degree in Petroleum and Mining Engineering.

For all the details, please follow the jump. [click to continue…]


Loudon Speaks To Republican Women

by The Editors on March 5, 2015

Gina LoudonDr. Gina Loudon, the co-author of What Women Really Want will be speaking at a luncheon hosted by the Carlsbad Republican Women Federated on Tuesday, March 24, 2015.

Dr. Gina has two master’s degrees and a PhD, and is a homeschooling mother of 5, one by the blessing of adoption who has Down Syndrome. She is credited as one of the 100 founding members on the Tea Party Movement. Dr. Gina moved to Southern California in 2012 to engage in the culture war and made a big splash when she appeared on a prime time ABC reality show as an outspoken conservative.

The luncheon will be at the Green Dragon Tavern at 11:00 AM and costs $35 for members and $35 for non-members. The Green Dragon Tavern and Museum is located at 6115 Paseo del Norte, Carlsbad, California. For more information, please follow the jump. [click to continue…]


Happy Hour Politics With Brad Dacus

by The Editors on May 5, 2014

9982131On Thursday, May 15, 2014 Carlsbad’s Happy Hour Politics is presenting Brad Dacus and his topic The Eroding of your Moral Rights: How to Right Wrongs Legally at The Crossings at Carlsbad.

Brad Dacus served as Legislative Assistant to U.S. Senator Phil Gramm, and went on to receive his Juris Doctor from the University of Texas, School of Law. For the next five years, Mr. Dacus coordinated religious freedom and parental rights cases throughout the Western states. In 1997, Mr. Dacus founded Pacific Justice Institute, where he serves as President and continues to defend religious liberties and parental rights. The Pacific Justice Institute has a network with hundreds of volunteer affiliate attorneys and handles more cases on the West Coast than any other organization of its kind.

Yes, if you voted for President Obama we’re guessing you’d find some great people to argue with at this gathering. Happy Hour Politics begins at 5:30 PM and costs $15 (including appetizers) but you’ll have to buy your own drinks. For the official word from Happy Hour Politics, follow the jump. [click to continue…]


Get Riehl: Voters Crash Tea Party

by Richard J. Riehl on November 8, 2012

No TeapartyYou could hear a collective sigh of relief in school district offices throughout California after voters approved Prop 30 on Tuesday. Not that happy days are here again for school funding. The Carlsbad school district has already cut costs by $6.1 million this year. Teachers, managers and other school workers pitched in with $2 million of that amount in pay cuts.

If Prop 30 had failed to pass, another $4.8 million would have been slashed from city schools, amounting to a hit of nearly $11 million in a single year.

But the best news from Tuesday’s election results is that the air is beginning to leak from the anti-tax Tea Party balloon. Maybe it’s the irony voters are beginning to see in the public’s eagerness to contribute millions to political campaigns to support candidates who pledge not to raise their taxes by a dime and who hate government so much they’ll say or do anything to win a seat in it.

[click to continue…]


Get Riehl: Showdown at Sage Creek

by Richard J. Riehl on October 10, 2012

Sage Creek-1According to a local newspaper columnist, allowing Carlsbad’s new high school to sit empty for at least a year is the answer to the district’s financial woes. But T.K. Arnold’s argument for delaying the opening of Sage Creek High is about as watery as the school’s fictional namesake. A closer look reveals how his politics trumps his punditry.

Calling Prop 30 “Gov. Jerry Brown’s blackmail ballot” tells you all you need to know about Arnold’s political bias. But what’s equally troubling is his reasoning. In a facts-free claim, he says the district could “save hundreds of thousands of dollars each year” in operating costs that could be used to close a gaping budget hole as high as $11 million” if Proposition 30 fails. The mixed metaphor (I’m trying to picture a “high” hole) could make you chuckle if the subject weren’t so serious.

Arnold doesn’t bother to estimate the cost of letting a $104 million high school campus remain vacant for at least a year, as well as the loss of learning opportunities to students denied access to new facilities. [click to continue…]


Get Riehl: Prop A is Council’s Sweet Deal

by Richard J. Riehl on October 8, 2012

Getting fan mail from elected officials is one of my pet peeves. They want “my opinion on the issues,” they say. But what they really want is the answer to a question not included in their questionnaires: “Do you still love me?”

To add insult to injury, I’m paying the postage for their reelection campaign.

If politicians made decisions based on their deeper understanding of the issues, rather than their popularity, their newsletters would be more informative and voters could make better choices at the polls.

It’s doubtful the Civil Rights Act would have won the popular vote in the general election of 1964, the year Congress passed it into law. Our elected representatives had the courage to do what was right, at the risk of popular opinion. The Democrats lost the Solid South because of it.

Fast forward to this year’s Election Day in Carlsbad. By putting Proposition A on the ballot, the City Council found an easy way to shirk their responsibility for making tough decisions. What could be better for elected representatives than being allowed to decrease city employee benefits, but requiring a vote of the people to increase them?

It’s a politician’s dream. [click to continue…]


Get Riehl: Election Day Threats to Local Schools

by Richard J. Riehl on October 1, 2012

Images-10Carlsbad school officials worry that if voters don’t agree to a tax increase on November 6, a midyear budget reduction could lead to cutting the school year by up to three weeks. But a greater threat to local schools in the long run hangs on the outcome of the Presidential election.

Mitt Romney has announced a plan to “restore the promise of American education” by promoting choice and innovation. Titled, “A Chance for Every Child,” it signals a retreat from the goal of No Child Left Behind. A chance is not a promise. Romney’s vow to use federal funds to support school choice, rather than school improvement, will produce winners and losers. That’s a far cry from the role of public education as a springboard of equal opportunity for upward mobility.

Romney also believes school reform can be done on the cheap, evidenced by his claim class size doesn’t matter. He’s fond of quoting a 2007 McKinsey report, “How the World’s best performing school systems come out on top.” The consultants claim studies show good teachers are more important than smaller classes. To that earth-shattering discovery my response can only be, “well…duh!” [click to continue…]

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The Riehl World: A Lawmaker’s Lament

by Richard J. Riehl on April 19, 2012

Garrick PortYou can tell from his most recent mailer that Assemblyman Martin Garrick, R-Carlsbad, hates his job. He complains about having to work year-round in Sacramento, with little time to ask local voters what they want him to do there. Forced to accept an overblown salary while working full-time on issues that “are not priorities for the hard-working people of this state,” he can’t take a second job in the real world.

So what’s an unhappy State Assembly member to do? Survey his constituents, of course, to see if they agree he and his colleagues are overpaid, out of touch and underemployed.

Mindful of how busy we all are, Garrick boils his survey down to four simple, yes, or no questions and one “positive” or “negative” opinion. If you answer yes to the first question, lawmakers should have full-time careers and be part-time politicians, the next three are easy. Yes, you want a part-time legislature, yes, the legislature passes too many bills, and yes your representative is grossly overpaid. If you think “no” answers are acceptable, check out the answer sheet included or just Google “Congress: job ratings.” [click to continue…]

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